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8 Safety Tips You Should Keep In Mind During This Thanksgiving Day!

11/5/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage 8 Safety Tips You Should Keep In Mind During This Thanksgiving Day! This what could happen while deep frying a turkey.

According to the United States Fire Administration, there are the average number of reported residential building fires on Thanksgiving Day was more than double (2.1 times more) the average number of fires in residential buildings on all days other than Thanksgiving. The average losses for Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings, however, were less than the same measures for non-Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings. The majority of Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings took place in one- and two-family dwellings (65 percent) followed by multifamily dwellings (29 percent).

    1. In case of any emergency, call 911!
    2. Never wear loose fitting clothing when cooking. Those can easily could ignite and catch fire.
  • Don't leave your food unattended on the range or in the oven.
  1. Keep children out of the kitchen when cooking.
  2. Remove anything near the stove that could catch fire, including wooden utensils, oven mitts, plastic bags, or towels.
  3. Take extra precaution with turkey fryers. Turkey fryers increase your risk of burn or fire hazards. Be sure the oil used to fry the turkey is the right temperature and always fry outside in a well-ventilated area. Never put water on a grease fire use a fire extinguisher or flour to put it out.
  4. Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen. Be familiar with how the extinguisher works and teach your family to use it as well. Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen and teach your family how to use it.
  5. Stay alert. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

Sources:

  • “Thanksgiving Safety Tips”

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/lifestyle/2014/11/5-fire-safety-tips-to-keep-in-mind-this-thanksgiving/

Veterans Day Facts

11/5/2017 (Permalink)

General Veterans Day Facts Veterans Day honors those who served the United States in all wars, especially veterans.©bigstockphoto.com/Anthony Correia

In the USA, Veterans Day annually falls on November 11. This day is the anniversary of the  Treaty of Versailles of the whichwas signed on June 28, 1919 ending the World War I hostilities between the Allied nations and Germany. Every year veterans are thanked for their services to the United States on Veterans Day.

Today Veterans Day is intended to honor and thank all military personnel who served the United States in all wars, particularly living veterans.

An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday—a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nation’s history; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legislation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

The Uniform Holiday Bill (Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat. 250)) was signed on June 28, 1968, and was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. It was thought that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recreational and cultural activities and stimulate greater industrial and commercial production. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates.

The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of this day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of our citizens, and so on September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479), which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978. This action supported the desires of the overwhelming majority of state legislatures, all major veterans service organizations and the American people.

Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls.

Preparing for Winter Storms

11/1/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Preparing for Winter Storms Take some time this fall to check your home before the cold winter and snow comes!

More often than not, as homeowners, the last thing we want to do is home repairs.  Not only do they take time (and many of us don't have a lot to spare), but they can also be costly and sometimes tedious.  Small repairs such as changing a light bulb or fixing a leaky faucet can be put off until it is absolutely necessary to fix, but there are some repairs that should never be put off.  Unfortunately, many of these involve major things (and can come with an even more major price tag), but avoiding the two repairs listed below could actually cause bigger problems down the road when the cold freezing temperatures and snow hit us shortly.  

Foundation Issues

The foundation of your home is extremely important-it holds up your home's entire structure.  Cracks in the foundation are definitely something not to overlook when it comes to repairs. The last thing you want as a homeowner is for a crack to spread.  Checking your home's foundation in the fall will help prevent water from thawing snow or ice getting into your home in the spring.  

Plumbing Issues

Water anywhere other than in a pipe or sink basin is bad, especially for your home.  Plumbing issues and leaks anywhere in your property should be addressed as soon as possible.  Winter in the Chicago area is known for its below freezing temperatures.  This can sometimes take a toll on the plumbing and pipes in your home.  Checking them now will be a great step towards prevention. 

Roof Issues

Every home has a roof.  This is one of the most important parts of any building because it protects what is inside.  The roof is a major player when it comes to keeping up on repairs.  If you notice any leaks, missing or damaged shingles/tiles or any kind of sagging this should be fixed as soon as possible.  Leaks mean water will get into your home and then may lead to mold, structure damage and even possibly fire if it comes in contact with anything electrical.  Missing or damaged shingles can lead to a number of issues if not fixed and create weak spots in a roof. A sagging roof could signify moisture in the attic and could be a sign of poor ventilation, broken or cracked joists, rafters or the ridge line itself.  

Fireplace Issues

Fireplaces and other indoor heating systems with poor maintenance can cause fire, puff-backs and smoke damage. A fireplace is beautiful and keeps your home warm with low electricity bills but without proper care it can cause a house fire. Clean chimneys and flutes on your fireplaces annually. Get your furnaces checked once a year and keep your space heaters 3 feet or the recommended length away from any flammable objects. This includes window blinds/curtains, furniture, bedding, and decorative rugs.

Fire Damage Repair Should Be Done By Professionals

10/8/2017 (Permalink)

With quick and decisive fire damage repair, even the worst disasters can be put in the past. Roaring flames have been one of man’s greatest enemies since the dawn of ancient times, and though it’s easier to handle these days, it can still cause havoc if it gets out of control. Not only can the flames cause enormous damage, the ash, soot and smoke residue that remains will make the home almost noxious to live in. Both can create irritating odors, discolor walls or ceilings and cause breathing issues if there is a high concentration of ash left over.

Professional fire damage repair will remove the ash, odor and smoke residue left behind. This has to be done quickly because ash is acidic and will cause materials to deteriorate if allowed to sit for long. SERVPRO of Southern McHenry County technicians will work hard to provide a thorough cleanup.  This will include treatment of every surface that is affected by ash and soot. This includes cleaning down walls, ceilings, furniture and countertops. Ash and smoke will almost always be present in the vents and ducts as well, as they are quickly taken up by the HVAC system. SERVPRO’s technicians will access the home’s ducts to clean them out as well, preventing either from entering the home once again.

Upon eliminating all of the ash, soot, and smoke, the home will quickly be free of any lingering odor. It will be “Like it never even happened.”

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage? Call Us Today – (847) 516-1600

 We service all of these communities in Southern McHenry County           Algonquin, Cary, Crystal Lake, Fox River Grove, Huntley, Lake in the Hills, Trout Valley, Marengo, Village of Lakewood, Village of Oakwood Hills, Woodstock and Union.

History of Sweetest Day

10/8/2017 (Permalink)

General History of Sweetest Day Sweetest Day

Sweetest Day is a holiday celebrated every year on the third of October, primarily only in the Mid-West.

Creation of Sweetest Day is often attributed to Herbert Birch Kingston—a simple man who worked for a candy company—decided to spread a little love to the less fortunate who are often overlooked. So, he passed out heaps of candy to the orphans, the ill and the disabled in his hometown of Cleveland, Ohio.

As it turns out, the tradition stuck. Nowadays, Sweetest Day is a day to shower the ones you love with gifts and make them feel special, just like Valentine's Day. Even though, many people believe that Sweetest Day is for the guy and Valentine's Day is for the girl, that's not true. It's just another day to show love, respect, and appreciation for family, friends, and loved ones.

Have a happy Sweetest Day from everyone at SERVPRO of Southern McHenry County.

Columbus Day in the United States

10/1/2017 (Permalink)

General Columbus Day in the United States Statue of Christopher Columbus©iStockphoto.com/Lya_Cattel

Columbus Day is a national holiday in many countries in the Americas and elsewhere which officially celebrates the anniversary that remembers Christopher Columbus' arrival to the Americas on October 12, 1492.

Columbus Day first became an official state holiday in Colorado in autumn of 1905, and became a federal holiday in the United States in 1937

Since 1970 (Oct. 12), the holiday has been fixed to the second Monday in October, since 1957. It is generally observed nowadays by banks, the bond market, the U.S. Postal Service, other federal agencies, most state government offices, many businesses, and most school districts. Some businesses and some stock exchanges remain open, and some states and municipalities abstain from observing the holiday.

Have a happy Columbus Day from everyone at SERVPRO of Southern McHenry County.

Fire Prevention Week

10/1/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Prevention Week Celebration of Fire Prevention Week

This year, Fire Prevention Week in the United States is from October 8th through October 14th. According to the National Archives and Records Administration's Library Information Center, fire prevention week is on Record as the longest running public health observance. 

The first National fire prevention week was October 4th through the 10th in 1925. This started a tradition of the President of the United States signing a proclamation of recognition for the annual occasion. The yearly event falls on the week of October 9th and runs Sunday through Saturday. 

The week is in commemoration with the "Great Chicago Fire". The Great Chicago Fire took place on October 8th-9th 1871. This dreadful fire burned over 2,000 acres, destroyed over 17,400 structures, left 100,000 people homeless, and killed more than 250 people. Legend has it, the fire started after a cow kicked over a lamp. 

Source: www.nfpa.org

Halloween Fire Safety

10/1/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Halloween Fire Safety Have a Safe & Happy Halloween from SERVPRO of Southern McHenry County

For each year from 2011 to 2013, an estimated 10,300 fires were reported to fire departments in the United States over a three-day period around Halloween and caused an estimated 25 deaths, 125 injuries and $83 million in property loss. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) nearly half of decoration fires in homes occurred because the decorations were too close to a heat source.

Don't let these statistics scare you away from celebrating Halloween to the fullest! The vast majority of these fires are easily preventable. Here are a few safety tips to help ensure the holiday remains festive and fun.

  • Keep decorations far away from open flames and other heat sources like lights and heaters. Remember to keep all of your home's exits clear of decorations so nothing blocks escape routes.
  • Try a battery-operated candle or glow stick in jack-o'-lanterns. If you want to use real candles, be extremely careful. In this case, use long, fireplace-style matches or a utility lighter when lighting them inside jack-o'-lanterns. If there are children around, make sure they are watched at all times when candles are lit. Place the lit pumpkins well away from anything that can burn and far away from driveways, doorsteps, walkways and yards -- anyplace where trick-or-treaters may walk.
  • Use flashlights as alternatives to candles or torch lights when decorating walkways and yards. They are much safer for trick-or-treaters whose costumes may brush up against the lighting as they walk to from your door.
  • Choose costumes that don't require long-trailing fabric. If your child is wearing a mask, make sure the eye holes are large enough so they can clearly see where he is walking to prevent trips or falls near dangerous or flammable items.
  • Talk to your children and remind them to stay away from open flames, including jack-o'-lanterns with candles inside. Provide them with flashlights or glow sticks to carry for lighting as part of their costume.

Source: National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)

Classes of Mold

9/12/2017 (Permalink)

Like we always say, mold is everywhere and not all molds are harmful to us! Molds are often found in wet, damp places and can vary in color and smell. Mold is put into different categories based on their hazard:

Hazard Class C:

While this group of molds are not health hazards – they can cause structural damages, and are recommended to be removed.

Hazard Class B:

These are molds that if endured over long periods of time can cause allergic reactions

Hazard Class A:

These are the molds we want to identify and remove immediately! These molds create toxins and if not handle correctly the air quality of a structure with steadily decline.

If you feel like your home or business might be affected by mold.

Call SERVPRO at 847-516-1600. While we cannot determine what type of mold it may be – we can remediate it with no worry!

 Source:

https://www.moldbacteria.com/mold/common-building-molds-their-hazard-classes.html

Mold Coverage and Your Insurance Claims due to Water Loss Event

9/11/2017 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation Mold Coverage and Your Insurance Claims due to Water Loss Event Mold Due to a Water Damage

It has happened. There is water everywhere. Your carpet is saturated; the drywall is wet, your furniture and even some of your personal belongings. There are so many things running through your head: how am I going to get this dry; how much of this will my homeowner’s insurance policy cover; what if this water loss event leads causes mold?!

We are here to help you prepare, should a water loss event - such as a pipe burst, pipe leak, ice damming, hot water heater leak, etc. - occur in your home. Here are some tips to help you best handle the situation:

  1. Familiarize yourself with your declarations page. This is something that you should do, as a homeowner, once you move in to your home. This way, you know what is covered under your policy and you are not surprised when something isn’t covered. If you're not comfortable with what is or isn’t being covered, you can contact your insurance agent to make the desired adjustments.
  2. Document the loss as best you can.If a water loss event occurs, take date and time stamped photos. Keep record, such as call logs or copies of e-mails, of all interaction with your insurance company and any vendors you are using to help address the issue.
  3. If you see possible mold growth or you are getting musty-like odor, contact a mold inspection company to have a mold inspection and testing performed.If a water loss event is not properly and thoroughly dried up within 48 hours, mold can begin to grow. A mold inspection and testing by a Certified Mold Inspector will determine if "abnormal" or unhealthy mold conditions exist in the area affected by the water loss event.
  4. Monitor the health of those in the home.After the water loss event occurs, if any occupants of the home start experiencing adverse health reactions such as: allergy-like symptoms or respiratory issues, this may be an indication that areas were not properly dried up and mold may have started to grow. We strongly suggest having a mold inspection and testing done by a Certified Mold Inspector if any of the homes occupants are not feeling well while in the home.

If you have experienced a water loss event in your home and have concerns of mold, contact SERVPRO of Southern McHenry County at 847-516-1600. We service all of these communities in Southern McHenry County           Algonquin, Cary, Crystal Lake, Fox River Grove, Huntley, Lake in the Hills, Trout Valley, Marengo, Village of Lakewood, Village of Oakwood Hills, Woodstock and Union.